Home & + | Search
Featured Categories: Special Focus | Performance Reviews | Previews | DanceSpots | Arts and Education | Press Releases
Join ExploreDance.com's email list | Mission Statement | Copyright notice | The Store | Calendar | User survey | Advertise
Click here to take the ExploreDance.com user survey.
Your anonymous feedback will help us continue to bring you coverage of more dance.
SPOTLIGHT:
PERFORMANCE REVIEWS
ExploreDance.com is sponsored by
ExploreDance.com iPad Edition

New!
Read ExploreDance.com on your iPad!
Only $0.99 per issue! No ads!
www.exploredance.com/subscribe.htm
ExploreDance.com (Magazine)
Web
Other Search Options
Dr. Roberta E. Zlokower
Performance Reviews
Ballet
Symphony Space
USA
United States
New York City
New York
New York, NY
ExploreDance.com is sponsored by
ExploreDance.com Kickstarter Campaign

The ExploreDance.com Kickstarter campaign is live! Please consider backing our campaign to help us expand our coverage of dance.
www.kickstarter.com/projects/1306220552/exploredancecom
ExploreDance.com is sponsored by
******* ** **
exploredance.com

Les Ballets Grandiva 2007

by Dr. Roberta E. Zlokower
April 16, 2007
Symphony Space
2537 Broadway
New York, NY 10025
(212) 864-1414
About the Author:


Les Ballets Grandiva 2007
www.balletsgrandiva.com
Victor Trevino, Founding Artistic Director
Paul Boos, Ballet Master
Marcus Galante, Choreographer
Jose Coronado, Costume Designer
Philip Carroll, Musical Direction
Tony Marques, Lighting and Stage Manager
Kevin McAnarney, Press
Eliran Murphy Group, Marketing

At
Peter Norton Symphony Space
2537 Broadway at 95th Street
NY, NY 10025
212.864.5400
www.SymphonySpace.org
Ballet Grandiva is the newest and largest all-male ballet company in the world. Victor Trevino founded the Company in 1996, and it consists of 19 dancers and a repertoire of over 30 ballets and 60 scheduled performances that will take it to Japan, with another 60 planned for Australia and New Zealand. It takes a detailed approach to comedy as well as a technical approach to en pointe skills. (Program Notes).

(See Les Ballets Grandiva 2006)

Program:

Pas de Quatre: Staged by Victor Trevino after Perrot, Music by C. Pugni, Costumes by Jose Coronado, Lighting by Tony Marques, Performed by Natalia Macabre, Nina Minimaximova, Imelda Hardtos/Sue Nami, and Pearl Lee Gates.

They Who Wore White Flowers: Choreography by Brian Reeder, Music by Sergei Rachmaninov, Costumes by Jose Coronado, Lighting by Tony Marques, Performed by Nina Minimaximova, Momchil Mladenov, Sylvie Gruyere, and Marlon Altoe.

Spartacus: Choreography by Victor Trevino, Music by Aram Ilyich Khachaturian, Costumes by Jose Coronado, Set by Ambun Mori, Lighting by Tony Marques, Performed by George Callahan and Nina Minimaximova.

Grande Tarantelle: Choreography by Victor Trevino, Music by Louis Moreau Gottschalk, Costumes by Jose Coronado, Lighting by Tony Marques, Performed by Tetsushi Segawa and Julie Clark Kent & Momchil Mladenov and Pearl Lee Gates.

Dying Swan: Choreography by Allen Dennis, Music by Camille Saint-Säens, Original arrangements by Philip Carroll, Costumes by Jose Coronado, Lighting by Tony Marques, Performed by Karina.

Who Dares? (a symphony in weeee!): Choreography by Marcus Galante, Music by L. Anderson, Costumes by Oswaldo Muniz, Lighting by Tony Marques, Performed by the Company.

For the second year in a row, I was exceedingly impressed, watching an all-male ballet company en pointe, much of the time, with stage names such as Imelda Hardtos and Sylvie Gruyere. Each of the 19 male dancers, some new to the company and quite youthful in demeanor, and a few seasoned, such as Karina and Nina Minimaximova (Founder, Victor Trevino, himself), appears in drag, as a female dancer, and occasionally as himself, in campy male attire, formal tux or casual chic. Karina (Allen Dennis) is also a choreographer, as is Nina (Mr. Trevino), and costumes are perfectly fitted, elegant, simple, and authentically balletic. Many of the dancers even wear Freed of London toe shoes, the crème de la crème of pointe shoes. Tony Marques' lighting exudes glowing warmth, dim ambiance, brilliant sunshine, or stark spotlights, depending on the work. The music is recorded, and the choreographic timing was tight and synchronized, an amazing feat. Another feat was the total lack of error, no slips, rather full poise, balance, and presence, remarkable for any company presenting a six-work event.

Now, to the hilarity of it all, pure, wholesome entertainment. Pas de Quatre, for four dancers, replicates a ballet rivalry of four 1845 opera danseuses, who were united in a divertissement. One was known for long lines and balance, one for youthful vigor, one for coquettishness, and one for audience enthusiasm. The four Grandiva dancers were campy, bumping into each other, when dancing en pointe, backwards, or when creating an ensemble figure, pretending to be faint and flustered, and generally drawing their audience in, on this first work of opening night, in their two-night New York engagement. Artistic Director, Victor Trevino (Nina Minimaximova), who also staged this ballet, dances with striking virtuosity, his torso taut and his flexibility flawless. Jose Coronado's pink costumes were historically evocative.

They Who Wore White Flowers was a take-off of Antony Tudor's Jardin aux Lilas, with two couples mixing and matching, as the ballet progressed. Of course, this being Grandiva, the two "males" of the couples found each other, as well. When Grandiva males dance as men, they retain their actual names in the program, in contrast to when they appear as women, with stage names listed. Momchil Mladenov and Marlon Altoe were riveting in their surprise duo. Nina Minimaximova appeared in a lilac, silky dress, with Sylvie Gruyere in long, creamy white. Dancers are lifted, carried, turned upside down, and seductively pursued. Brian Reeder gave the company a must-see-again, sensual sensation.

Mr. Trevino's pas de deux for Spartacus, which was mounted in New York by the Bolshoi in 2005, was remarkable, all the more so for Mr. Trevino's third consecutive role this evening, as perfected and nuanced as the previous two. The warrior tent reminds us of the imminence of war and the elusiveness of love, as Spartacus and Phrygia make the most of each moment. Their lifts and lunges, elegant electricity, and impassioned interpretation gave the work meaning and relevance. Grande Tarantelle, Mr. Trevino's campy copy of New York City Ballet's Tarantella, choreographed by George Balanchine, retained the percussive tambourine, the lively Gottschalk score, and the bright, colorful costumes. Instead of one couple, Trevino used two, and Tetsushi Segawa was just as magnetic as Joaquin De Luz, who dances this role for City Ballet. The mid-air aerobics drove the audience wild.

Karina (Choreographer, Allen Dennis), seems to possess a body with no bones, as she undulates her arms, like wounded, feathery wings. She ripples her torso, slowly falling to the floor, eyelashes fluttering with emotion. In 2003, Nina Ananiashvili danced Fokine's The Dying Swan, and Dennis retained the Saint-Säens score, Fokine motif, and magnetizing mime. Jose Coronado's swan costume is exquisite. The final work of the program was Who Dares? (a symphony in weeee!), Marcus Galante's debut, a camp interpretation of City Ballet's Who Cares?, by Balanchine. Instead of Gershwin, Galante used music by L. Anderson, and this score switch seemed to lessen the potential for rhythmic jazz.

I'd love to see the same piece danced to Gershwin's Who Cares?, I'll Build a Stairway to Paradise, Fascinatin' Rhythm, Bidin' My Time, and My One and Only, all songs used by Balanchine in the original. However, what was serendipitous about this work was the milling about of dancers in the wings, à la Degas, just prior to the lifting of the curtain. And, Galante did fuse genre with voice, as the company came together in Balanchine-like gestures and Trevino-like originality. Dolly Dinkel (Benjamin Timothy), a new member of Grandiva, performed with exceptional affectations and flourish. Momchil Mladenov, the only male as male, partnered six females and led five more with superb skill. Nina, Karina, Julie, Sylvie, Imelda, and Marcia Payday were the lead females, in Oswaldo Muniz' fancy tutus en pointe. Galante's synchronized figures were indicative of his choreographic expertise. Kudos to Les Ballets Grandiva.
Les Ballets Grandiva

Les Ballets Grandiva

Photo © & courtesy of Erik Novoa


Les Ballets Grandiva

Les Ballets Grandiva

Photo © & courtesy of Erik Novoa


Les Ballets Grandiva

Les Ballets Grandiva

Photo © & courtesy of Erik Novoa


Les Ballets Grandiva

Les Ballets Grandiva

Photo © & courtesy of Erik Novoa


Les Ballets Grandiva

Les Ballets Grandiva

Photo © & courtesy of Erik Novoa


Les Ballets Grandiva

Les Ballets Grandiva

Photo © & courtesy of Erik Novoa


Les Ballets Grandiva

Les Ballets Grandiva

Photo © & courtesy of Erik Novoa


Les Ballets Grandiva

Les Ballets Grandiva

Photo © & courtesy of Erik Novoa


Les Ballets Grandiva

Les Ballets Grandiva

Photo © & courtesy of Erik Novoa


Les Ballets Grandiva

Les Ballets Grandiva

Photo © & courtesy of Erik Novoa


Les Ballets Grandiva

Les Ballets Grandiva

Photo © & courtesy of Erik Novoa


Les Ballets Grandiva

Les Ballets Grandiva

Photo © & courtesy of Erik Novoa


Les Ballets Grandiva

Les Ballets Grandiva

Photo © & courtesy of Erik Novoa


Les Ballets Grandiva

Les Ballets Grandiva

Photo © & courtesy of Erik Novoa

ExploreDance.com is sponsored by
* **** ****


ExploreDance.com
ExploreDance.com is sponsored by
******* ******
exploredance.com


home || view our calendar || the store || copyright information || join our mailing list || mission statement
Search for articles by
Performance Reviews, Places to Dance, Fashion, Photography, Auditions, Politics, Health