Home & + | Search
Featured Categories: Special Focus | Performance Reviews | Previews | DanceSpots | Arts and Education | Press Releases
Join ExploreDance.com's email list | Mission Statement | Copyright notice | The Store | Calendar | User survey | Advertise
Click here to take the ExploreDance.com user survey.
Your anonymous feedback will help us continue to bring you coverage of more dance.
SPOTLIGHT:
PERFORMANCE REVIEWS
ExploreDance.com is sponsored by
ExploreDance.com Kickstarter Campaign

The ExploreDance.com Kickstarter campaign is live! Please consider backing our campaign to help us expand our coverage of dance.
www.kickstarter.com/projects/1306220552/exploredancecom
ExploreDance.com (Magazine)
Web
Other Search Options
Marian Horosko
Performance Reviews
Tap
Symphony Space
USA
United States
New York City
New York
New York, NY
ExploreDance.com is sponsored by
******* ** **
exploredance.com

Tap City 2008

by Marian Horosko
July 11, 2008
Symphony Space
2537 Broadway
New York, NY 10025
(212) 864-1414
The seventh New York City Tap Festival, produced by Tony Waag, filled Symphony Space, July 8-11 with joyous audiences, and a cast of headliners from the past and present. America's indigenous art form, with a slight bow to clogging, came of age after the turn of the century, when huge movie theaters flourished in every large city, extravagant shows were staged and "headliners" performed in the circuit creating memories that are still fondly remembered. The styles and personalities of the performers contributed to the vocabulary of hoofing, singing and patter. The Newport Jazz Festivals brought "stars" to the attention of the country and Ed Sullivan on early television, presented tapper Peg-Leg Martin along with Jimmy Slyde, who recently passed away, and was honored as an international ambassador. Although Hollywood films in the '30 and '40 created "names," it was the live performer who carried the art form into the hearts of the public.

This year's International Tap Dance Awards went to tap legends "Brownie" Brown of Cook and Brown, who appeared with the vaudevillian entrance of looking disarmingly at the audience during an entrance and an exit; Harold Cromer of Stump and Stumpy, and Mable Lee. Each received the award graciously, a plastic shoe-sole statuette with taps. But it was Mable Lee, who made the audience want to see more of her sassy act, now diminished by time to eye-rolling and a slight movement in the hips. She had the manners to thank the audience for her award.

Tony Waag, producer and host, is a most congenial, courteous and charming master of ceremonies, who sings and dances himself, just at the right time between "acts" to create a welcome breath, a slight pause before resuming the non-stop event.

The performance of international tappers on July 11, included dancers from around the world, South America, Asia and a Russian tapper, who danced on his hands, all performing traditional steps to their native music. Onstage musicians were piano, percussion and bass with an unexpected ukulele, and marimba band. Unexpected as well, but part of the tap tradition, was a sand dance, created by performers, who used the sand that put out the fires of railway engines and spilled onto the platforms. They created a different sound from the percussive Coca Cola metal caps. Sandman Simms, was its most inventive choreographer. This gigantic seventh festival involved film and talks, as well as a boat ride around Manhattan. To see past performer-greats: Rhythm Red, Chuck Green, Jimmy Slyde and others, visit the Musical Theater Division at the NY Public Library at Lincoln Center. "Time Steps and Other Times," was a film produced for PBS, Channel 3 at that time, 1960s. This gigantic event went smoothly, involved young dancers and included events such as a film, talks, and a boat ride around Manhattan.

For more information about classes, tour information and other events: ATDF, 18 West 27th St., New York, NY, www.atdf.org
Karen Callaway Williams

Karen Callaway Williams

Photo © & courtesy of Lois Greenfield


Barbara Duffy, Mable Lee, Tony Waag, and Margaret Morrison

Barbara Duffy, Mable Lee, Tony Waag, and Margaret Morrison

Photo © & courtesy of Debi Field


Kazu Kumagai

Kazu Kumagai

Photo © & courtesy of Debi Field


Tony Waag and Mable Lee

Tony Waag and Mable Lee

Photo © & courtesy of Debi Field


the late Dr. Jimmy Slyde, who will be inducted into the International Tap Dance Hall of Dance

the late Dr. Jimmy Slyde, who will be inducted into the International Tap Dance Hall of Dance

Photo © & courtesy of Debi Field


Tony Waag

Tony Waag

Photo © & courtesy of Debi Field


Tony Waag

Tony Waag

Photo © & courtesy of Debi Field


Harold Cromer, who was inducted into the Int'l Tap Dance Hall of Fame.  Mr. Cromer is an invaluable teacher/choreographer/mentor at Tap City.  Born in NYC, he first appeared on Broadway in 1940, doing a tap dance to Ethel Merman's singing in the original production of 'DuBarry Was a Lady.'

Harold Cromer, who was inducted into the Int'l Tap Dance Hall of Fame.   Mr. Cromer is an invaluable  teacher/choreographer/mentor at Tap City. Born in NYC, he first appeared on Broadway in 1940, doing a tap dance to Ethel Merman's singing in the original production of "DuBarry Was a Lady."

Photo © & courtesy of Debi Field


Dr. Jimmy Slyde, also inducted into the International Tap Dance Hall of Fame.

Dr. Jimmy Slyde, also inducted into the International Tap Dance Hall of Fame.

Photo © & courtesy of Carolina Kroon

ExploreDance.com is sponsored by
* **** ****


ExploreDance.com
ExploreDance.com is sponsored by
******* ******
exploredance.com


home || view our calendar || the store || copyright information || join our mailing list || mission statement
Search for articles by
Performance Reviews, Places to Dance, Fashion, Photography, Auditions, Politics, Health